Copyright 1999 Times Mirror Company
Los Angeles Times

July 18, 1999, Sunday, Home Edition

SECTION: Opinion; Part M; Page 4; Letters Desk

The Times seemed to think DreamWorks' pullout of the environmental
nightmare on one of the last remaining wetlands in California worthy of
front-page status (July 2). What I found odd, however, was that no mention
was made of one of the obvious reasons they backed off: DreamWorks was
unable to get an exemption from the state water board for cleaning up the
toxics left by the previous tenants.

The studio would have been built on a 100-acre toxic chemical leak from
Howard Hughes' old aircraft factory. Or how about the thousands of
activists who spent hours attending hearings, town hall meetings, writing
letters to Steven Spielberg and protesting every Friday night at the
intersection of Lincoln and Jefferson? Might this have figured into the
decision? This would have been Spielberg's biggest flop.

DENISE MUNRO ROBB



Copyright 1999 Times Mirror Company
Los Angeles Times


March 31, 1999, Wednesday, Home Edition

SECTION: Metro; Part B; Page 6; Letters Desk

LENGTH: 147 words

HEADLINE: KAZAN PROTEST

* In his March 24 letter, Michael MacIntire completely missed the point of
the protest against Elia Kazan and the academy. As one of hundreds of
protesters against Kazan's honorary Oscar, I will tell you quite clearly
that those who sat on their hands were certainly not in "solidarity with
Stalin."

In fact, Stalin would have applauded the tactics of the House Un-American
Activities Committee, which made people inform on their friends at the

BODY:
* In his March 24 letter, Michael MacIntire completely missed the point of
the protest against Elia Kazan and the academy. As one of hundreds of
protesters against Kazan's honorary Oscar, I will tell you quite clearly
that those who sat on their hands were certainly not in "solidarity with
Stalin."

In fact, Stalin would have applauded the tactics of the House Un-American
Activities Committee, which made people inform on their friends at the
threat of losing their jobs. People were forced to reveal their party
affiliations, as well as those of their closest friends and acquaintances.
This ugly period in American history (which should be nonexistent because
of our Bill of Rights), shows just how close the U.S. came to being a
totalitarian, undemocratic society. Aside from party differences, Stalin
would have stood up for Kazan.

DENISE MUNRO ROBB
Los Angeles



Copyright 1997 Times Mirror Company
Los Angeles Times

September 23, 1997, Tuesday, Home Edition

SECTION: Metro; Part B; Page 6; Letters Desk

LENGTH: 267 words

HEADLINE: LAND MINE TREATY

What a shock to read the Sept. 18 front page and see that the United
States (along with China, Iraq, Russia, Pakistan, Israel and India)
refused to sign the treaty banning antipersonnel land mines. The fact that
100 nations, including Canada, France, Britain, Germany and Italy, have
all signed this treaty should be a clue. We continue to be the lone
barbarians in the Western world.

One of the outcomes of the mourning of Princess Diana will be that all
those Americans who are still grieving will decide that fighting for the
ban on land mines (as she did) will be a great homage to her. Beware, Mr.
President, this may be something your administration cannot get away with.
The public is not always asleep.

DENISE MUNRO ROBB


Copyright 1994 The Times Mirror Company
Los Angeles Times


June 2, 1994, Thursday, Home Edition

SECTION: Westside; Part J; Page 15

LENGTH: 187 words

HEADLINE: HISTORY: PRESERVING MIRACLE MILE BUILDINGS

I've lived in the Miracle Mile district all my life; my Mom grew up there,
too ("What Price History," May 22). Granted, we do not have buildings such
as the Taj Mahal or a showcase designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, but the
1920s buildings and apartments are all we have to crow about. It's our
architectural heritage!

Somehow it doesn't surprise me that landlords in the Miracle Mile South
district desire to tear down these buildings. It appears to be a ritual
here in Los Angeles to demolish older, quaint buildings to accommodate a
parking lot or another apartment building.

I agree with Denise Robb of the Miracle Mile Action Committee -- if I see
one more balloon-laden apartment building in the Miracle Mile area, I'll
scream. And as for landlord Host Beil, who said, "There's no reason for a
building from 1929 to be a historical monument" and "I was born in
Germany, and my town goes back thousands of years," all I can say is:
Sorry, Mr. Beil, we're a few thousand years behind. Give us a chance to
catch up. Start by preserving the buildings in the Miracle Mile South
area.

LINDA HARRIS