Denise Munro Robb For City Council

responsible growth-responsive government

 

COPE QUESTIONNAIRE

 

Miguel Contreras, Executive Secretary-Treasurer

and Jan Borunda

Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO

(213) 383-1745

 

Name:   Denise Munro Robb

 

Home Address:

 

            325 S. Cloverdale Ave. #105

            Los Angeles, CA 90036

Phone:   213-745-7622

Fax:      same

 

Occupation:        Paralegal - Immigrant's Rights

 

Employer:          National Immigration Law Center

                        3435 Wilshire Blvd. #2850

                        Los Angeles, CA 90010

                        213-639-3900 ext. 117

 

work email:        robb@nilc.org

 

Campaign Address:

 

            5850 Third St. #356

            LA, CA 90036 (for mail)

 

and

 

The Peace Center

8124 W. Third St. #103

Los Angeles, CA 90048

 

phone: 213-745-ROBB

 

email: denise@panix.com

 

Website: DeniseMunroRobb.com

 

Political Consultant: Greg Jan

 

Campaign ID# 1235306

 

Name of Campaign Committee: Denise Munro Robb for City Council

 

Political Party:    Green

 

Which Public Offices Have You Held:

 

I am currently an elected official on the Los Angeles Green Party County Council

 

Have you previously been endorsed by COPE?

 

I have never been interviewed or met with COPE before.

 

 

In which national, state, legislative general elections or statewide ballot proposition elections have you not voted in the past five years? Why not?

 

I have always voted.

 

Briefly Describe Your Work Background

 

Currently I work at the National Immigration Law Center, a low-income immigrant's rights organization that serves as a support center for the entire country. We have many class action impact litigation lawsuits against the INS and we've been successful at most of them. Some of the issues we work on is securing health care and pre-natal care for undocumented workers, suing the INS over anti-immigrant legislation such as IIRIRA and IRCA, and we recently had a victory in the Gorbach de-naturalization case in which we prevented the INS from denaturalization thousands of citizens. We were also co-plaintiffs in the No on Prop 187 case, among others. I assist the Director of Litigation with these cases, conducting research, etc.

 

My job immediately before this job was the Executive Director for Southern California Americans for Democratic Action from 1994-1997. I worked very closely with SEIU Local 660, and was arrested during the protest against the closing of County USC Medical Center. I also marched with H.E.R.E. Local 14. We participated in numerous pro-union activities. Before that I served on the board of ADA for three years.

 

Briefly Describe Your Educational Background

 

I attended UCLA when I was 18. I returned to college at age 33 to finish my bachelors in Political Science. I attended Santa Monica City College and Cal State University, Los Angeles, consistently maintaining a 3.9 GPA and earning 6 scholarships.

 

Are you a union member?

 

Yes.

 

To Which Unions Have You Belonged?

 

I currently belong to AFTRA. In the past I belonged to AFSCME.

 

What was the level of participation in your union?

 

My participation has been with SEIU, H.E.R.E., the Justice for Janitors movement, the strawberry boycott and more recently in anti-sweat shop activities.

 

To what fraternal, professional, civic or social organizations do you belong?

 

I am a member of the Bus Riders Union, the Sierra Club, the LA Greens, and I am the current President of the Miracle Mile Action Committee.

 

From What other groups are you seeking or have you received endorsements?

 

The National Women's Political Caucus, Planned Parenthood, NOW, Sierra Club and League of Conservation Voters.

 

How Much money have you raised to date for your campaign? How much money do you have on hand for your campaign?

 

We have raised over $7,000 and we have some large fundraisers coming up in the next two weeks. We have spent more than $4,000 so far.

 

How much money do you think you will need to raise to run a successful campaign?

 

$25,000.

 

What Amount of Personal Financing are you willing to provide?

 

$5,000

 

OVERVIEW

 

Briefly describe your key priorities if elected.

 

-       Instituting a living wage similar to that just passed in Santa Monica

-       Trying to empower neighborhoods so the need to secede isn't as dire

-       Building a workable transportation system, implementing the consent decree for the Bus Riders Union, and creation of light rail throughout the city

-       Compliance by the LAPD of the consent decree - implementing more community based policing and incentives to keep police on the job and in the city

-       Affordable housing - in the true sense of the word

-       More parks

-       Improvement of infrastructure

 

What Qualities Distinguish you from other candidates for this office?

 

I am not a career politician. I am running for this office because I really care about people and want to make Los Angeles a better place to live. I have 27 years of community activism and am committed to social justice and worker's rights. My entire life has been dedicated to this and running for office is just a natural extension of the desire to make this a more livable and equitable city.

 

Briefly state why you are seeking Labor's endorsement.

 

Labor has always been on the front lines of social activism. I have always fought for issues that involve working people and believe that we must stand together if we are to succeed against such forces as monopoly, NAFTA, GATT and the new FTAA agreement. I would be proud to be endorsed by labor. I want your endorsement and I want you to walk precincts with me.

 

If the Los Angeles County Federation Endorses you, will you carry the endorsement on your materials?

 

Yes.

 

Briefly state your position on the following issues:

 

Broader Living Wage Legislation

 

Yes. I support Santa Monica's living wage, which not only encompasses the city employees but private beachfront employees as well. We need this in Los Angeles for private employers.

 

Workplace Health and Safety

 

We need to protect laws that allow a worker to sue when his health is at risk. Corporations and lobbyists are rewriting laws to make it easier for workers to be exploited. They must be protected to the full extent of the law and the laws must be changed to enact greater protection.

 

Project Labor Agreements for Public Works Projects

 

Project Labor Agreements have been successful not only for public works projects such as dam building and other large construction projects, but also for private projects as well. Boston has more than $20 million in project labor agreements right now. We need to fight the Bush administration's ban on them because they are a great way to ensure plenty of union labor is hired and they also ensure there won't be any work stoppages so it seems to be a win-win situation for everyone.

 

 

 

Secession Efforts from City of Los Angeles

 

44% of the city wants to secede. If we give neighborhood councils real decision making power, hold meetings at night, provide child care and hold meetings in the districts in which the issues are decided upon, it's possible that the parts of the city that feel disempowered might change their mind. However, if secession is inevitable then collecting bargaining must be protected and continued and the entire County must be allowed to bargain as a group.

 

Access to Affordable Quality Health Care

 

I spent two years of my life trying to pass the single payer health care initiative (Prop 186). Unfortunately it failed but I continue to support full health coverage for all people.

 

Workers Freedom to Choose a Union

 

I support the neutral card check and believe workers must be allowed to unionize. The federal government must step in and force employers to accept the decision made by workers.

 

Intervention of Elected Officials in Labor Disputes

 

Elected officials should stand up for the rights of oppressed workers and do whatever is necessary to help resolve the dispute.

 

Breakup of LAUSD into Mini School Districts

 

The study just released shows the mini-districts have created more bureaucracy and lower test scores. Clearly, there is a problem. There is much too much money spent at the top and not enough on teacher's salaries. If, like secession, we do break the district into truly different districts then we must not create a greater level of bureaucracy. We must also ensure collective bargaining as a county to protect the rights of teachers. Also much more money needs to be spent on schools and new schools must be acquired.

 

SIGNATURE

 

I attest that these answers represent my actions and beliefs, are not part of my public record, and may be used by AFL-CIO unions to keep union members informed about important issues

 

 

 

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Denise Robb                                                                   Date